Thy Will Be Done, Mr. President

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Some Ghanaians in a celebration mood

It was a bright morning, the sun appeared early and the birds filled the skies with the symphony of their squeaking. Children and the elderly wielded Ghana branded products; statesmen wore their expensive kente and suits. It showed how special the day was. It was a day for celebration, it was Independence Day Celebration.

The Independence Day celebration is a time to reflect and celebrate the forefathers, whose blood and toils led to freedom from British colonial rule on March 6, 1957. The celebration is also a time for Ghanaians to evaluate the level of development since independence and the way forward.

Some citizens think the country has not achieved what it is supposed to have achieved after fifty five years of independence, others think regardless of the development level, we should be grateful for the freedom and peace that makes the country enviable among countries on the continent and the world as a whole.

Ghana can vaunt of churning great leaders who have fought and are fighting for peace and unity on the African continent and that’s an achievement that some developed countries will pay millions to have. This can be attested to via the high ranking positions that our former presidents are occupying and the high powered conferences that our sitting president has been moderating.

In an election year, many people were wishing the president to take advantage of the situation and boast about his government’s achievements. But the president who has been preaching peace before and after he won the 2008 election rather took benefit of the celebration to continue with his peace message. President John Atta Mills with the moniker ‘Asomdwe Hene’ proudly promised Peace before and after the elections.

In his speech at the 55th Independence Day parade, the president gave a strong assurance that Ghana will continue to enjoy the nonaggressive ether “before, during and after” the elections in December.

“I pledge that Ghana will remain peaceful before, during and after the elections,” President   Mills averred   

I believe this message has given Ghanaians the assurance that there is no cause for alarm even with tension brewing towards the elections. Politicians who mount our airwaves make scary comments about how the elections are going to be edgy. For example, with comments like “All die be die” “boot for boot”  “draining down the dirty gutters,” and many others, the peaceful political environment in the country is gradually becoming insecure. And so we need such messages from our leaders to give us hope that there’s no cause to panic.

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President Atta Mills and Nana Akufo-Addo

It is with bliss to note that the flag bearer of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) Nana Addo Danquah Akufo-Addo agrees with the president on the preservation of peace during and after the elections.

Nana Akufo-Addo has requested politicians to psyche themselves for a win or lose during the elections. He has also urged them to channel grievances that may arise “during and after” the elections to appropriate institutions for them to be addressed.

Speaking at this year’s Oppenheimer Lecture at  the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, the NPP leader did not shred words by saying he is not ready to spill “a single drop of blood” to become president of Ghana.

These two influential men are doing well with their peace talks. We only hope they are not just buying sympathy votes from innocent Ghanaians with these sweet messages.

If Nana Addo and President Mills could advise their communication teams to refrain from the use of discourteous language on radio and TV, I think their messages will descend well with Ghanaians.

Knowing the President for who he is, I believe he would live by his words and give room for free and fair elections. I think Ghanaians would not like to trade the peaceful atmosphere being enjoyed for any other thing in this world.

The president has spoken well, other politicians agree with his message; Ghanaians are ready to play their roles in the conservation of peace and so we say Thy Will Be Done Mr. president.

 

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